My thoughts of beer

August 3, 2009 at 7:17 pm 1 comment

I think Stephen Colbert said it best.  Obama said that this (the Prof. Gates incident) was a teaching moment and Stephen Colbert responded by saying that Obama is teaching that if you arrest a black man under questionable circumstances, you get to have a beer with the President.

I thought the choice of beer was interesting.  I mean the actual choice of having beer… but then the actual choice of what beer they chose was interesting too.

Obama chose Bud Light.  I know he had to carefully choose this.  It’s not even really beer. Real beer has flavor to it.  The reason why it’s just a step up from water has an surprising history.

During the war, rationing was taking place in this country.  So Anheuser-Busch had to cut back on its beer ingredients, thereby making Bud have its now known watery flavor.  But they discovered something in the process.  They made what is known as the “least offensive” beer.  What does this mean?

Guinness is a distinct flavor;  so is something like IPA.  You either like them or you don’t.  But if you have something that tastes almost like water, well then most people can tolerate it.  As much as I don’t prefer Bud Light, I’ll buy it for parties because everyone can drink it, and it’s cheap.  But in terms of taste, no one can say it tastes the best.  Those that do have never explored the options of fine beers out there, many made in the good ol USA at local microbreweries.  Like Nimbus’s red ale.  Good stuff.

A-B then started a massive marketing campaign.  So now Bud is associated with football and hot girls in bikinis.  It’s America’s beer!

That is, until you check the facts and realize it is now owned by a Belgium company.  So American beer it is not.  But who cares about silly things like facts?

By choosing beer for the meeting instead of, say, a Washington state pinot noir or a summery gin and tonic, what was the president trying to telegraph?

I’d say he’s attempting to cater his appearance to the everyday layperson throughout Middle America. Beer is one of the oldest alcoholic beverages in the world, and the oldest and most popular in the United States. Most of the rebel meetings of our Founding Fathers were based around a pub, or a big tub of beer, and many of them brewed beer on the side. Many of the world’s most important — and maybe some of the worst — decisions were probably based around a glass of beer.

Can you tell us what the beer choices for the summit might tell us about the quaffers? (For Obama: Bud Light, owned by Belgian beverage giant InBev; for Gates, Red Stripe, Jamaica-brewed and owned by premium drink behemoth Diageo; and for Crowley, Blue Moon, owned by MillerCoors.)

They’re all really session beers — a description that originates in Britain. They’re the kind of beers drunk when a bunch of mates sit down and drink pint after pint after pint of light, refreshing beers. Session beers are meant to be drunk in quantity — they don’t fill you up and can be drunk without too many deleterious effects. Maybe President Obama and Professor Gates want to project something that appeals to the masses, but the officer is probably drinking simply what he likes.

And the beers?

Bud Light is considered a “lawn mower” beer, perfect for after mowing the lawn or when you get home from work. It’s one step up from a nice, tall glass of ice water and generally one of the lightest pale lagers made in the United States. Red Stripe is also a pale lager, but it’s an official handmade product, with a little more flavor and flair. And Blue Moon is also mass-produced, but it’s an ale. It’s a more flavorful beverage, with some floral character and hints of coriander and orange peel. None of these are microbrews or craft beers, but the closest is Blue Moon, a tasty beer that’s a macrobrewer’s attempt to join the craft beer market.

via Obama Beer Summit Choices Make For A Happy Hour : NPR.

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Entry filed under: Food, National. Tags: , , , , .

Math and aerospace in Tucson? Why is good “white” and bad “black”?

1 Comment Add your own

  • 1. hoboduke  |  July 30, 2009 at 4:26 pm

    Let’s get this routine explained. President was in the college scene, and professors serving beer to students is standard operating procedure. Normally, some females are invited for sexual diversity! When he discussed a “teaching moment” that is how teaching is done at University of Wisconsin!

    Reply

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